EXERCISES FOR KNEE PAIN AFTER A HIKE

Hiking is good for you. But as with any form of exercise, there is a risk of injury. This is usually classic damage caused by over-exertion, such as climbing uphill for an extended period of time.

One of the most common complaints is knee pain after hiking. Most keen hikers suffer from this problem at some point. The following exercises can help eliminate or alleviate the pain.

TRIGGERING THE REAR THIGH

Effect: Relieves deep muscle tension in the back thigh area. Combats knee pain after hiking.

Instructions: Place the BLACKROLL® TMX® TRIGGER on the floor and sit with your legs outstretched. Lay one leg on the TMX® TRIGGER and start triggering an individual tender point. When the pain subsides slightly, alternate bending and extending your knee.

Time: Three minutes per side

Sets: Once per side

Tip: You can also perform this exercise while sitting in a chair. The pressure will be a little more intense. If your muscles are sore the next day, take a day off.


TRIGGERING THE FRONT THIGH

Effect: Relieves deep muscle tension in the front thigh area. Combats knee pain after hiking.

Instructions: Start in a prone position and place the BLACKROLL® TMX® TRIGGER on a tender area on your thigh. When the pain subsides, you can start to lift your heel towards your buttocks and then straighten your leg again.

Time: Three minutes per side

Sets: Once per side

Tip: If your knees ache, make sure that you perform the exercise slowly. If your muscles are sore the next day, take a day off.


QUAD STRETCH

Effect: Stretches the front thigh. Combats knee pain after hiking.

Instructions: Lie on your side on the floor. Bend your lower leg at the hip and knee joint so that you are stable. Now grasp the other leg at the ankle with the upper hand and pull the heel toward your buttocks. You will now feel a stretch in the front of your thigh. Then repeat the stretch with the other leg.

Time: One to two minutes per side

Sets: Once per side

Tip: Push your hips forward a little to increase the stretch.

Other types of pain commonly felt by hikers:

Don’t let it get to the point of pain – prevention is best:

  • Make sure you have the right equipment. Wearing the right shoes is key. If in doubt, seek advice from a specialist when it comes to choosing your hiking or trekking shoes.
  • After exercise, massage your legs and feet using a BLACKROLL® self-massage technique.
  • Remember: your hike isn’t over when you get to the top. Most injuries and accidents happen on the way down.
  • A well-planned route is half the battle (consider the length of the hike, the elevation, difficulty and alternative routes).
  • Check the weather forecast to avoid adverse conditions.
  • Don’t push yourself too hard. If in doubt, opt for an easier route. Over-estimating one’s abilities is the most common cause of injury on alpine hikes.